Spelling

Many words sound alike but mean different things when put into writing. This list will help you distinguish between some of the more common words that sound alike.

Accept, Except

·        accept = verb meaning to receive or to agree:

·        He accepted their praise graciously.

·        except = preposition meaning all but, other than:

·        Everyone went to the game except Alyson.

Affect, Effect

·        affect = verb meaning to influence:

·        Will lack of sleep affect your game?

·        effect = noun meaning result or consequence:

·        Will lack of sleep have an effect on your game?

·        effect = verb meaning to bring about, to accomplish:

·        Our efforts have effected a major change in university policy.

A memory-aid for affect and effect is RAVEN: Remember, Affect is a Verb and Effect is a Noun.

Advise, Advice

·        advise = verb that means to recommend, suggest, or counsel:

·        I advise you to be cautious.

·        advice = noun that means an opinion or recommendation about what could or should be done:

·        I'd like to ask for your advice on this matter.

Conscious, Conscience

·        conscious= adjective meaning awake, perceiving:

·        Despite a head injury, the patient remained conscious.

·        conscience = noun meaning the sense of obligation to be good:

·        Chris wouldn't cheat because his conscience wouldn't let him.

Idea, Ideal

·        idea = noun meaning a thought, belief, or conception held in the mind, or a general notion or conception formed by generalization:

·        Jennifer had a brilliant idea—she'd go to the Writing Lab for help with her papers!

·        ideal = noun meaning something or someone that embodies perfection, or an ultimate object or endeavor:

·        Mickey was the ideal for tutors everywhere.

·        ideal = adjective meaning embodying an ultimate standard of excellence or perfection, or the best:

·        Jennifer was an ideal student.

Its, It's

·        its = possessive adjective (possessive form of the

·        pronoun it):

·        The crab had an unusual growth on its shell.

·        it's = contraction for it is or it has (in a verb phrase):

·        It's still raining; it's been raining for three days.

(Pronouns have apostrophes only when two words are being shortened into one.)

Lead, Led

·        lead = noun referring to a dense metallic element:

·        The X-ray technician wore a vest lined with lead.

·        led = past-tense and past-participle form of the verb to lead, meaning to guide or direct:

·        The evidence led the jury to reach a unanimous decision.

Than, Then

Than

used in comparison statements: He is richer than I.

used in statements of preference: I would rather dance than eat.

used to suggest quantities beyond a specified amount: Read more than the first paragraph.

Then

a time other than now: He was younger then. She will start her new job then.

next in time, space, or order: First we must study; then we can play.

suggesting a logical conclusion: If you've studied hard, then the exam should be no problem.

Their, There, They're

·        Their = possessive pronoun:

·        They got their books.

·        There = that place:

·        My house is over there.

·        (This is a place word, and so it contains the word here.)

·        They're = contraction for they are:

·        They're making dinner.

(Pronouns have apostrophes only when two words are being shortened into one.)

To, Too, Two

·        To = preposition, or first part of the infinitive form of a verb:

·        They went to the lake to swim.

·        Too = very, also:

·        I was too tired to continue. I was hungry, too.

·        Two = the number 2:

·        Two students scored below passing on the exam.

 

Two, twelve, and between are all words related to the number 2, and all contain the letters tw.

Too can mean also or can be an intensifier, and you might say that it contains an extra o ("one too many")

We're, Where, Were:

·        We're = contraction for we are:

·        We're glad to help.

(Pronouns have apostrophes only when two words are being shortened into one.)

·        Where = location:

·        Where are you going?

(This is a place word, and so it contains the word here.)

 

·        Were = a past tense form of the verb be:

·        They were walking side by side.

Your, You're:

·        Your = possessive pronoun:

·        Your shoes are untied.

·        You're = contraction for you are:

·        You're walking around with your shoes untied.

(Pronouns have apostrophes only when two words are being shortened into one.)

I/E Rule:

Write I before E

Except after C

Or when it sounds like an A

As in "neighbor" and "weigh"

i before e: relief, believe, niece, chief, sieve, frieze, field, yield

e before i: receive, deceive, ceiling, conceit, vein, sleigh, freight, eight

Exceptions:

seize, either, weird, height, foreign, leisure, conscience, counterfeit, forfeit, neither, science, species, sufficient

Please see our exercises to practice these rules.

-ible, -able Rule

-ible

-able

If the root is not a complete word, add -ible.

aud + ible = audible

Examples:

·        visible

·        horrible

·        terrible

·        possible

·        edible

·        eligible

·        incredible

·        permissible

If the root is a complete word, add -able.

accept + able = acceptable

Examples:

·        fashionable

·        laughable

·        suitable

·        dependable

·        comfortable

If the root is a complete word ending in -e, drop the final -e and add -able.

excuse - e+ able = excusable

Examples:

·        advisable

·        desirable

·        valuable

·        debatable

Some exceptions:

·        contemptible

·        digestible

·        flexible

·        responsible

·        irritable

·        inevitable

Exercise : -ible and -able Spelling Exercise 1

In the following paragraph there are fourteen words ending with -ible or -able, some of which are misspelled. Read the paragraph, locate the misspelled words and write the correct spellings in the space provided below the paragraph.

Most people thought that Michael, an eligable bachelor, was an adorable, personible man. Mattie, however, found him detestable. Some time ago, Michael promised to take Mattie to a fashionible restaurant for a remarkible dinner. As horrable as it sounds, Michael took Mattie to the local McDonald's. Most of the food there was either inedable or undigestable. Mattie was as irritable as possable when she told her roommates about her terrible date. "Whoever finally marries that contemptable Michael," Mattie said, "is certainly not going to be in an enviable position."

Correct spellings below:

eligible

personable

fashionable

remarkable

horrible

inedible

undigestible

possible

Contemptible

Exercise : -ible and -able Spelling Exercise 2:

In the following sentences, the final four letters are omitted from each -ible or -able word. Complete each word with the appropriate ending.

1. Last night's movie about the invis____ man was so incred____ that it was laugh____.

2. My irrespons____ little brother is usually kept away from anything break____.

3. Are these new clothes really comfort____, or do people only wear them because they are fashion____?

4. I think I would be less irrit____ if my professors were more flex____.

5. I don't think voting twice in national elections is permiss____.

6. It's always valu____ to have a friend who is depend____.

7. My employer said that it isn't suit____ to have a secretary whose handwriting is illeg____.

Answer : -ible and -able Spelling Exercise 2:

In the following sentences, the appropriate endings are included here. Correct answers are in bold and incorrect answers are in italics.

1. Last night's movie about the invisible man was so incredible that it was laughable.

2. My irresponsible little brother is usually kept away from anything breakable.

3. Are these new clothes really comfortable, or do people only wear them because they are fashionable?

4. I think I would be less irritable if my professors were more flexible.

5. I don't think voting twice in national elections is permissible.

6. It's always valuable to have a friend who is dependable.

7. My employer said that it isn't suitable to have a secretary whose handwriting is illegible.

Source: http://www.k12reader.com/high-school-spelling-words-36-week-program/

·        https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/660/1/

·        https://owl.english.purdue.edu/exercises/4/21/

·        https://owl.english.purdue.edu/exercises/4/21/47/answer

·        https://owl.english.purdue.edu/exercises/4/21/48/answer

Helpful Links:

1.         https://quizlet.com/61278919/ged-spelling-set-1-flash-cards/ [Spelling flashcards]